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21 October 2009 @ 11:33 am
e-readers  
Because I know it's going to come up at some point and time, let me just weigh in on the new B&N Nook device, as a Kindle user and lover.

It looks good. It looks like B&N put some serious thought into it, not just as a device, but also as competition for the Kindle. It's the same basic size and shape, but instead of the Kindle's keypad, it has a cool looking color touch screen - with a black and white e-ink screen above it, so you aren't sacrificing your eyes for a cool factor. The only other cool thing it has over the Kindle, you can apparently "lend" books to friends for 14 days. Two caveats:

~ initial reports on this feature suggested you'd only be able to "lend" books to people you'd willingly share your credit card info with. Um, no thanks. Can't find reference to it in the new literature, so maybe they got rid of that requirement?

~ reports now say "not all books will be available for lending" - makes you wonder if the publishers get to pick and choose whether or not to allow their books to be lent out.

The Nook also sports the ability to download books directly from B&N, however, articles I have read intimate that initially, this feature will only be available in the store, although they expect it to open up to any "hot spot" soon. (Um, ok.)

By contrast, Kindle can now be used to d/l books anywhere in the world, if you have the International version.

I do think the Nook looks cool, and has some excellent features. It's a solid entry into the e-reader world. I think it's the most direct competition Kindle has had, actually, and that's a good thing. More competition = Amazon stepping it up with future versions of the Kindle.
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-peartreealley on October 21st, 2009 06:47 pm (UTC)
The one big thing that caught my eye was the toting that the Nook would have access to like a million books. I find about 1/4 of the books I'm looking for on my Kindle aren't available in Kindle edition, and that drives me crazy sometimes.

It sounds like the BN reader is more of just an e-reader--another thing that bothers me in hindsight about my Kindle is that feeling that if I ever drop Kindle, I've just lost a chunk of my book collection. I feel the same way about iTunes/iPods and stopped using it about a year ago.

As I said in another comment, when it's time for my Kindle 2 to be replaced, I'll be re-evaluating my e-reader options, as we get more and more of them.
jennemjennem on October 21st, 2009 07:14 pm (UTC)
I'm wondering how they're counting what books are accessible. I don't think Amazon.com "counts" books that are in the public domain. I wonder if B&N is counting them—I have a hard time imagining that B&N is capable of contracting with publishers better than Amazon.com is.

But, yeah—I'm glad there are more and more e-readers on the market, even if I'm sticking with my Kindle for the time being because it just means that different companies will have to work harder for business by making their products better.

I think until publishers finally let go of DRM (which doesn't actually protect their products), portability is going to be a problem. But, most of the music industry has agreed to let Apple finally sell their music without the DRM (making it possible to convert things purchased in iTunes), so hopefully they'll wise up soon.